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An extract from the Morphogenesis Architecture Monograph, to give you a peek into the mind space of one of India’s best recognized, sustainable design practices.

Part 4: Extract from Sustainability: Passive Design

We bring you the fourth of a 14 part series of extract from the Morphogenesis Architecture Monograph, to give you a peek into the mind space of one of India’s best recognized, sustainable design practices.

Workplace: India Glycols Headquarters

“The headquarters for India Glycols Limited sits on an expressway in Noida, a suburb of New Delhi. The morphology is inspired from the ancient development of Fatehpur Sikri, near Agra. The serene interiors are designed as a series of courtyards enclosed within the fort-like external walls. The introverted scheme acts as a heat shield to protect from the harsh climate and bleak exterior views.

This building addresses energy, heat and lighting from a sustainable perspective – economising on the first, defeating the second and optimising the third.

The opaque exterior walls contain within them Jenga-like juxtaposed volumes, which house the workspace and are seamlessly integrated with the central landscaped courts. This inside-outside connect is strengthened by raising the outer landscape to the ‘work-desk’ level.

The office complex demonstrates that even with a need for seclusion, workspaces can establish connections with the outside.

Inspired from the traditional baoli and kund (small tank or reservoir) concepts, microclimate tempering is affected by the multiple shallow water bodies and mist gardens. Construction techniques and features such as cavity walls, fenestration design, terrace gardening and water bodies aid in reducing solar ingress and absorption

This project gave the firm its fifth Indian Institute of Architects Award. The design enhances collaboration spaces to allow for socio-cultural intermingling and cross-pollination of ideas, and exemplifies the ideology of ‘equity and transparency’ in the workplace as an integral part of its architectural vocabulary.”